The 2020 rollercoaster: between exhaustion and success

The good thing about 2020? It is almost over.

It has been difficult and disruptive and I can’t count the times where I was just so exhausted, tired, frustrated, sad, angry, exasperated — at the world, at isolation, lockdown, the emotional drain, anything and everything.

Yet, as I wrote a brief recap for my colleagues at Mozilla to reflect on all the things we achieved in terms of sustainability, I suddenly had to sit back and realise that though I may be emotionally and mentally exhausted, I am also incredibly proud of what we’ve been able to pull off. And not just because of 2020. These achievements would be successes in any circumstance.

Full post on Medium.

Release: Mozilla’s Greenhouse Gas emissions baseline

It was a proud moment indeed:

After months and months of work with contributions from over 50 data owners working with data engineering, legal and trust, marketing as well as many more individuals, we finally released Mozilla’s greenhouse gas emissions baseline report. It’s been quite the learning journey, thank you to everyone involved, including those that keep cheering me up when things get tough!

I am excited that we get to be this transparent and open about what we learn and I am very much looking forward to building on these findings and working out the details for Mozilla’s reduction and mitigation strategy.

Announcement and report on the Mozilla blog.

Blog: Virtual Tours of the Museum of the Fossilized Internet

In March 2020, Michelle Thorne and I announced office tours of the Museum of the Fossilized Internet as part of our new Sustainability programme. Then the pandemic hit, and we teamed up with the Mozilla Mixed Reality team to make it more accessible while also demonstrating the capabilities of social VR with Hubs.

We now welcome visitors to explore the museum at home through their browsers.

Read more on the Mozilla Blog and check our Demo Tour on YouTube.

Blog: Mozilla’s journey to environmental sustainability

You can read the full post including process, strategic goals, and the four principles we’ve set for engaging on this issue on the Mozilla Blog: https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2020/05/28/mozillas-journey-to-environmental-sustainability/

All I can say: It feels really good to finally be able to share a first insight into my new role, the challenges and opportunities that come with it. It won’t be an easy ride but I look forward to embarking on it!

Blog: Road to Sustainability: Introducing the Museum of the Fossilized Internet

Welcome to the Museum of the Fossilized Internet.

This museum was founded in 2050 to commemorate two decades of a fossil-free internet and to invite museum visitors to experience what the coal and oil-powered internet of 2020 was like.

Gasp at the horrors of surveillance capitalism. Nod knowingly at the plague of spam. Be baffled at the size of AI training data and lament the binge culture of video streaming.

Read the full post, including an announcement to tour the museum around Mozilla’s global offices here: https://foundation.mozilla.org/en/blog/road-sustainability-introducing-museum-fossilized-internet/

Blog: What came out of Reimagine Open?

Last year, the many concerning headlines about the state of the internet prompted us into action. “It seems like we’re at a crossroads where we should take a step back to critically revisit what we envision for the future of our digital lives — and how we can bring about the change that we want to see in a connected world,” Michelle Thorne and I wrote.

We launched an open consultation process called Reimagine Open to refine our vision for the future of the web and our understanding of openness. Could the internet’s historic open architecture help us address today’s challenges in a constructive manner?

Over 100 people from 25 countries joined in-person focus groups and nearly 20,000 people from more than 160 countries shared their thoughts in a broad-based online survey.

Read full post on Internet Citizen.

Blog: How to end the global governance gridlock?

It’s generally accepted that democracy is in crisis worldwide, and that spaces for civic participation are shrinking. Meanwhile, the so-called “techlash” is polarising debates around how governments around the world should govern the internet and social media.

For years, I’ve heard people talk about fostering dialogue between diverse stakeholder groups and the importance of soliciting input from a wider range of voices. And yet, when it comes to developing comprehensive policies nearly everyone reverts back to engaging the networks and processes they know (and are comfortable with) instead of experimenting with new models for deliberation and decision-making.

Here’s a checklist to do better and increase impact.

Full piece on Medium.

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