My personal carbon footprint

It’s not a pretty number: 255t.

That’s the carbon budget I used up during my lifespan so far. I used the CO2 calculator of the German Environment Agency (Umweltbundesamt) to estimate my annual footprint, which currently amounts to 3,54t.

In comparison to the average German citizen (11,6t CO2e), my carbon footprint is comparatively small and yet not anywhere near where it needs to be: below 1t per person annually, if we want any chance to stay within the boundaries of global warming below 1.5°C.

Here is how I got to my overall, lifetime estimate.

I started by calculating my current annual emissions (pictured above). I have a green energy contract (“Ökostrom”) for my electricity as well as my heating and have been on such a renewable plan for the past 6 years. Before that, I procured green energy but, as far as I can recollect and/or reconstruct, the heating ran on district heating (“Fernwärme”). I used the same calculator to estimate the additional CO2 for heating during those years (adding 0,29t annually).

I never owned a car and tend to get around either by public transport or bike, so those estimates are fairly similar over the years and one of the factors where the average German citizen with their car-dependent culture ends up on a way higher emissions spectrum.

Another big factor in those calculations are dietary preferences. I’ve been on a vegetarian diet for more than 20 years, favouring regional, seasonal, and organic products whenever possible, which according to the calculator saves around 0,37t per year. Multiplying these by my childhood years before I opted to be vegetarian, I added those to my overall carbon footprint as well.

In addition, in my estimated annual carbon footprint I did not account for an average number of flights per year but instead calculated all my flights separately. Going back through old records, calendars and trip memorabilia, I ended up with an excel sheet of 348 flights. I’ll note that some 90% of these were business trips and I can tell you that going through my records in this strange, pandemic-ridden year of 2020 where I haven’t left the country since January made this all the more cringe-worthy. I am not planning to go back to such an intense travel schedule, ever.

My overall flight impact amounts to 118,19 mt CO2e.
Sidenote: t for tonnes and mt for metric tons are primarily regional differences, with mt favoured in the U.S.

If you’re curious how to calculate this, you can find the required steps, including the package for airport codes and calculating the distances between airports here: https://sheilasaia.rbind.io/post/2019-04-19-carbon-cost-calcs/
Using “R”, you convert the list of flights from kilometres to miles, multiply them by 0.24 to convert to pounds of carbon dioxide, then by a factor of 1.891 for airborne emissions and run that against your sheet. If you’re wondering why the factor for flight emissions is bigger than 1, that’s because CO2 emitted higher up in the earth’s atmosphere has a greater warming potential, referred to as “radiative forcing”.


Adding flights, annual estimate multiplied by my age and accounting for differences in consumption, energy and heating adjustments, I ended up with approximately 255t.


Using atmosfair.de as a point of orientation to estimate the price for offsetting all my already accrued emissions, well aware that avoiding and reducing is highly preferable but hardly implementable post the fact, I would have to invest around 5.865 Euro to offset my personal emissions — for my entire lifespan. It’s both a lot for a one-off donation and not much at all, given the overall impact and need for mitigating the climate crisis.

I decided to start with a 750€ investment (i.e. 32,61t CO2) and will be looking into other high potential and scalable projects going forward to balance out the emissions I haven’t been able to avoid to date. But even more importantly, these calculations make it abundantly clear to me that we need to more vocally call on governments to adopt necessary legislation and on business to live up to their responsibilities.

This transformation isn’t optional, the climate crisis affects us all — and “paying” to continue spending (i.e. emitting) is not sustainable. We need an incentive structure that actually allows us to avoid and reduce in a much more consistent and meaningful manner than is currently possible.

Demo: Social VR and its potential

I’ve always loved the potential of Mozilla Hubs and certainly enjoyed exploring social VR spaces as an alternative to meeting people, not least during the pandemic. Now, I finally got the opportunity to collaborate on a project.

We’ve transformed and art project, the “Museum of the Fossilized Internet” into a 3D model that can be visited directly through the browser. I had so much filming this demo tour in VR with Dan Fernie-Harper, Liv Erickson, Elgin-Skye McLaren and Michelle Thorne:


And if you too are excited about the potential of social VR spaces, for example as an alternative to in-person conferences, you should totally read up on the Mozilla Hubs Cloud offering that the team recently launched: https://blog.mozvr.com/announcing-hubs-cloud/.

Blog: Virtual Tours of the Museum of the Fossilized Internet

In March 2020, Michelle Thorne and I announced office tours of the Museum of the Fossilized Internet as part of our new Sustainability programme. Then the pandemic hit, and we teamed up with the Mozilla Mixed Reality team to make it more accessible while also demonstrating the capabilities of social VR with Hubs.

We now welcome visitors to explore the museum at home through their browsers.

Read more on the Mozilla Blog and check our Demo Tour on YouTube.

Blog: Mozilla’s journey to environmental sustainability

You can read the full post including process, strategic goals, and the four principles we’ve set for engaging on this issue on the Mozilla Blog: https://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2020/05/28/mozillas-journey-to-environmental-sustainability/

All I can say: It feels really good to finally be able to share a first insight into my new role, the challenges and opportunities that come with it. It won’t be an easy ride but I look forward to embarking on it!

(Virtuelles) Panel: Bits & Bäume

Am 23. April durfte ich gemeinsam mit der Parlamentarischen Staatssekretärin im BMU Rita Schwarzelühr-Stutter und Prof. Dr. Stefan Naumann vom Umweltcampus Birkenfeld zum Thema Nachhaltigkeit mit Blick auf Hard- und Software diskutieren. Es war definitiv ein interessantes Format, mit vielen guten Frage und Ideen, die ich nicht nur in meiner neuen Rolle als Mozillas Nachhaltigkeitsbeauftragte besonders zu schätzen weiß.

Mehr zur Veranstaltung.

Blog: Road to Sustainability: Introducing the Museum of the Fossilized Internet

Welcome to the Museum of the Fossilized Internet.

This museum was founded in 2050 to commemorate two decades of a fossil-free internet and to invite museum visitors to experience what the coal and oil-powered internet of 2020 was like.

Gasp at the horrors of surveillance capitalism. Nod knowingly at the plague of spam. Be baffled at the size of AI training data and lament the binge culture of video streaming.

Read the full post, including an announcement to tour the museum around Mozilla’s global offices here: https://foundation.mozilla.org/en/blog/road-sustainability-introducing-museum-fossilized-internet/

New Role: Mozilla Sustainability Steward

I couldn’t be more excited. It’s a pleasure and an honor to share that I’ve been ask to take on a new leading role within Mozilla, building up a dedicated programme to advance environmental sustainability.

It won’t be a walk in the part, but it’s the sort of challenge I could’ve only hoped for. For now, we’ve created a wiki where we’ll be sharing projects, ideas, and findings — have a look and ping me should you wish to get involved!

https://wiki.mozilla.org/Projects/Sustainability

Blog: What came out of Reimagine Open?

Last year, the many concerning headlines about the state of the internet prompted us into action. “It seems like we’re at a crossroads where we should take a step back to critically revisit what we envision for the future of our digital lives — and how we can bring about the change that we want to see in a connected world,” Michelle Thorne and I wrote.

We launched an open consultation process called Reimagine Open to refine our vision for the future of the web and our understanding of openness. Could the internet’s historic open architecture help us address today’s challenges in a constructive manner?

Over 100 people from 25 countries joined in-person focus groups and nearly 20,000 people from more than 160 countries shared their thoughts in a broad-based online survey.

Read full post on Internet Citizen.

Fellowship: Asian Forum on Global Governance

In January this year, I was provided with the opportunity to travel to India as a Raisina Young Fellow to become part of a wonderful cohort of individuals during the Asian Forum on Global Governance.

I captured some highlights on Instagram, noting:

The #AFGG2020 fellowship was such an incredible experience. 48 people, 28 countries. Too many pictures, too many moments, and all the laughs and fun to choose from.
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We danced. We explored. We debated. We acted. We competed. We listened. We graduated. And obviously: So. Much. More.
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With huge thanks to the Observer Research Foundation and ZEIT-Stiftung for providing us with this opportunity. More to come, no doubt.
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#raisinadialogue #raisina2020 #afgg #youngfellows #globalgovernance #fellowship #lifelonglearning #bondingmoments #friendship #personalgrowth #delhi #india #2020journey #newperspectives

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